Stanford University
Torres del Paine in Chile by Nora Hennessy

Climate Solutions

Photo by Nora Hennessy

Climate change is the defining challenge of the 21st century

Human activities and resource use are altering Earth’s climate, through emissions of greenhouse gases and particulates, and through alteration of the land surface. Climate change, in turn, is affecting other Earth processes. Stanford Earth faculty work across disciplines—and at the interface of atmosphere, ocean, land, ice systems, and human behavior. They characterize climate changes and help develop adaptation strategies that matter to people.  

Stanford Climate Solutions

Finding Climate Solutions

At Stanford, we focus on understanding and communicating climate change risks, as well as how to limit and adapt to those changes.

Meet some of our faculty involved in Climate Solutions

Noah Diffenbaugh
Noah Diffenbaugh

Professor of Earth System Science

Rob Jackson
Rob Jackson

Professor of Earth System Science

Chris Field
Chris Field

Professor of Earth System Science and Biology

kate maher
Kate Maher

Associate Professor of Earth System Science

Dustin Schroeder
Dustin Schroeder

Assistant Professor of Geophysics

Alexandra Konings
Alexandra Konings

Assistant Professor of Earth System Science

Research highlight

Climate change has worsened global economic inequality

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Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

The institute creates research programs to tackle sustainability challenges and connects scholars with decision makers to develop practical solutions to real-world problems.

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Climate solutions-related news

Plastic ingestion by fish is a growing problem

A new research review finds the rate of plastic consumption in fish has doubled in the past decade and continues to increase. Fish higher up on the food chain are at the greatest risk.

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Landscape disruptions threaten Paris climate agreement goals

A new study finds emissions from deforestation, conversion of wild landscapes to agriculture, and other changes in land use worldwide contributed 25 percent of all human-caused emissions between 2001 and 2017.

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Sulfur plays a role in the ocean carbon cycle, study finds

The results suggest a possible feedback that could help trap carbon in the ocean’s low-oxygen zones, but the impact on climate change remains unclear.

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The shifting burden of wildfires in the United States

Wildfire smoke will be one of the most widely felt health impacts of climate change throughout the country, but U.S. clean air regulations are not equipped to deal with it. Stanford experts discuss the causes and impacts of wildfire activity and its rapid acceleration in the American west.

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