Stanford University

Media Mentions

US flood damage rose 30 percent in 30 years, a sign of warming

“This shows that there is real economic value in avoiding higher levels of global warming,” said Stanford climate scientist Noah Diffenbaugh. “That’s not a political statement. That’s a factual statement about costs."

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The Marshall Islands could be wiped out by climate change

E-IPER PhD candidate Caroline Ferguson co-authored an op-ed about the challenges faced by residents of the Marshall Islands, a nation made up of 29 low-lying coral atolls that stretch across more than a million square miles of Pacific Ocean.

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What is the monetary cost of climate change?

Stanford environmental economist Marshall Burke discusses the cost of ignoring climate change with "The Daily Show" correspondent Dulcé Sloan.

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Harsh droughts can actually start over oceans

“It’s not an obvious thing to wrap your head around. It’s a little counterintuitive to think about droughts over the ocean, because it’s wet,” Julio Herrera Estrada said about recent research co-authored with Noah Diffenbaugh.

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Look up: Helicopter will dangle electromagnet array over valley this week

Research led by Rosemary Knight uses a spider web-shaped device hanging from a helicopter to map underground water supplies.

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Climate change briefs: Death by heat on land and at sea

Kelp can mitigate ocean acidification but is it capable of lasting climate change? Researchers found the advantages minimal, as Heidi Hirsh commented, "one of the main takeaways for me is the limitation of the potential benefits from kelp productivity."

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Phytoplankton remain surprisingly active underneath Arctic sea ice

“There was a long-standing assumption that what was happening under the sea ice in the water column was almost ‘on pause’ during the polar night and before seasonal sea ice retreat, which is apparently not the case,” said Mathieu Ardyna.

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Where Europa's water lives

The plumes seen erupting from Jupiter's moon Europa might be fed by water trapped in the world's crust, according to a new study led by Stanford Earth postdoctoral researcher Gregor Steinbrügge.

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Europa's plumes may not originate from subsurface ocean

“We developed a way that a water pocket can move laterally – and that’s very important,” said Stanford geophysicist Gregor Steinbrügge. “It can move along thermal gradients, from cold to warm, and not only in the down direction as pulled by gravity.”

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As Cape Town races to save water, risk of 'Day Zero' drought seen rising

“In the worst-case scenario, events like the ‘Day Zero’ drought may become about 100 times more likely than they were in the early 20th-century world,” said Salvatore Pascale, a research scientist in Earth system science. 

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Climate experts warn of deepening drought

“We’re certainly in a drought-risk posture statewide at the moment,” said Stanford climate scientist Noah Diffenbaugh. “Having the odds tip toward a warm, dry winter suggest the potential for deepening drought conditions.”

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Emissions from food production endangering goals of Paris Agreement

Research co-authored by Inês Azevedo finds reducing food system-related emissions is critical to preventing global temperatures from rising 1.5 or 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.

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Cutting greenhouse gases from food production is urgent, scientists say

Rising emissions from food production will make it extremely difficult to limit global warming to the targets set in the Paris climate agreement, even if emissions from fossil-fuel burning were halted immediately, according to a study co-authored by Inês Azevedo.

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Study finds corn increasingly sensitive to drought

Research led by David Lobell finds that corn has become more sensitive to drought conditions. New technologies are so helpful in raising yields in good conditions that the cost of bad conditions are rising.

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COVID-19 and emissions

"Lockdowns requiring us to shelter at home, and global unemployment are not sustainable ways to cut emissions," Rob Jackson writes. Among other changes, cleaning up the global energy sector while still supplying more energy for a billion people living in poverty will be needed to attain climate goals.

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Report calls on California to lead on carbon capture

"Early efforts to address climate change focused on decarbonizing the electricity and transport sectors," said Stanford's Sally Benson, co-leader of a plan for carbon capture in California. "Fewer people thought about what deeper decarbonization might imply for the broader economy and jobs."

 

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